NEW CROWN 1

Verbs - Flash card set and 3 hint character quiz worksheet

In this lesson, I've included my verb flashcard set. I made for 6th graders in an attempt to expand their verb choices so they could at least make more interesting sentences using the "I can~" grammatical framework.
These flashcards can also be made into Karuta cards if you print them out in 6 slide sheet style through PowerPoint.

Alphabet Code Breaker

This writing game can be done in pairs, groups, or solo. There are two versions, an easy one and a harder one.

Level 1: Students match the number to the letter to find the word. Write the word.
Level 2: Students match the number to the letter THEN unscramble the letters to find the word. Write the word.

Answer key is included. All words are from the first few pages of NEW CROWN 1 (the photo/vocab pages 8-11) but could potentially be used for ES grades 5-6.

What's this? / Is it a ~ ? Mosiac Guessing Game

Model the dialogue with the OTE:
S1: "What's this?" (show #1)
S2: "何これ?! Oh, is it a cat?"
S1: "No, it isn't. What's this?" (show #2)
S2: "Hmm, is it a cucumber?"
S1: "No, it isn't. What's this?" (show #3)
S2: "Ah! Is it an eggplant?"
S1: "Yes, it is."

Have the students pair up along desk columns and rotate the columns to switch partners, or walk around and talk to random partners, or race in teams up and down the rows to complete the dialogue.
So many options.

Which toppings do you want? Build-Your-Own-Burger

DEMONSTRATION 

(e.g. ALT is the customer and and OTE the store employee.) 

OTE: "Welcome to EIGO Burger! You can make your own burger! 

ALT: "Nice! I'm super hungry!" 

OTE: "Which meat do you want?" 

ALT: "Beef, please." 

OTE: "Which toppings do you want?" 

ALT: "Cheese, onions, lettuce, and tomato, please." 

OTE: "What sauce do you want?" 

ALT: "Mayo, ketchup, and tabasco, please." 

How can I get to...?

This is a variation of a worksheet I found on Englipedia.

 

Students are divided into groups of 3, and each group has a variation of a map they must complete. They are given three landmarks on their map, but the rest are blank. The goal is to fill in each blank space with a landmark and to draw a path leading to the closest train station.

Here's the catch: every group's map has different landmarks given, so they need to find out the locations from other groups.

Present Progressive (~ing) Describing Pictures

Simple. Fun. Low prep.

1. Students make groups of 4.

2. Give each group a copy of the same picture.  A3 coloured. 

3. Have students write as many sentences as they can based on what they see in the picture. (5-10 minutes per picture) E.g. The bear is drinking coffee. The boy is running. He is sitting. She is reading.

4. ALT/OTE - walk around to help groups. 

5. Have a student from each group read their sentences. (Optional/time consuming)

ABC sugoroku bingo

1. Once you have explained and demonstrated the rules, have the students move their desks into groups of 4. (Lunch groups are fine too, but be sure to keep the numbers within 3-5 students per group.) 

2. Have each student take out a pencil (colored is okay!) and an eraser (or something similar to use as a game piece).

3. Give each student an ABC Bingo Card and have them write their names. 

4. Give each group an ABC Sugoroku game sheet and  a 6-sided die. 

 

Rules: 

Will you (do these activities for polite language)?

These ideas were brainstormed at SDC Jan 2017 in a lesson crowd-sourcing seminar. Many thanks to Joshua Gourdie, Matthew McClellan, Sarah Blackwell, Sara Shaw, Jian-xin Tay, and John Scanlan. 

Although the examples are for 2nd year grammar, they can be adapted for 1st and 3rd years as well. 

1. Go Fish: Instead of asking "Do you have ~" to get cards, ask "Will you~?" /"Can you ~?" / "Could you/would you~?" 

Will you ~~ please?

At the beginning of activity, walk around class with large cards and ask crazy questions to students.

Next hand out worksheets and have students interview each other with dialogue in pairs, stressing that they must complete actions.

 

Dialogue

A:                       Hello?

B:                       Hello?

 

A:                       Will you ______________ please?

Super Mario World – What time is it now?

  • First ensure students are confident with grammar point ‘What time is it now?’
  • Hand out half of the students with A worksheet and half with B worksheet, practice repeating dialogue.
  • Ensure students can pronounce cities names and understand the meaning of morning, afternoon and evening.

Q:  What time is it in Los Angeles now?

A:  It’s four o’clock in the afternoon.

Does he/she play – Battleship

Simple Battleship worksheet, students play in pairs.

 

Each pair draws their three ships of various sizes (this can be demonstrated on a large copy on the board) then play battleship with their pages hidden from their partners view.

In place of 1,2,3 a,b,c students will use Does (character) (verb)?

 

Eg.

a. Does Luffy play soccer?

b. HIT: Yes, he does.

b. MISS: No, he doesn’t.

My Super Friend

Organize students in pairs then handout ‘My Super Friend work sheet A + B’ to each pair.

Read both paragraphs to entire class once, then have each pair read their respective paragraphs to themselves.

Have students highlight or underline any points they think are important for answering the questions on the worksheet.

Next have pairs read their paragraphs to each-other and exchange information about their characters by asking the questions provided on the worksheet.

 

The Sengoku Game

Students are divided into teams, preferably six. Each team nominates a leader, and on their turn the leader comes to the blackboard.

They say the name of a Japanese prefecture, such as Hyogo. They then have thirty seconds (or a full minute for first years) to come up with a word that starts with each letter of the prefecture. For example, Hello You Orange Great October. No repeats, and the words must have at least three letters.

When is your FACE? English poster making

1. Introduce the grammar point: “When is ~ ?” with a short listening activity using holidays.

A worksheet is not required, but it is a good idea to have a reward scheme set in place for volunteers. If you have a quiet class you may want to choose the students randomly from the roll.

The ALT and the OTE have a short and simple conversation about their *fictional* coming weekend. The students need to listen, so make it simple and repeat.

What’s this? What’s that? This is… That is….. WOW!

1. Oral introduction – ALT and OTE use a short dialogue to explain the grammar point.

For example: (The ALT and the OTE are on opposite sides of the room. The ALT is holding a black pen and the OTE is holding a red pen).

ALT: This is a black pen. That is a red pen (Pointing at your pen, then pointing at their pen).

OTE: This is a red pen. That is a black pen. (Pointing at your pen, then pointing at their pen).

Colour Grab

Make square cards (about a little smaller than your palm) in the various colours you will teach. Each colour set will have numbers (some the same, some different) written in large font on them.

Scatter your pre-made colour number cards around the blackboard, making sure they are as evenly spaced as possible.

This is… what?

The ALT will bring in a mystery item, hidden in a box or a bag (so that the students can’t see). Using “this is” and simple adjectives (preferably described with actions if possible) explain what the object is. When a student finally guesses, that student can receive praise or a reward.

Next, place students into pairs and give the students a dictionary each. They must choose an item that they own and use “this is” + adjectives to give clues to their partner. Their partner must answer and use “it is/it’s a ____”.

HOW did you do it?

Create a handout for each student with a ‘you’ section and a ‘your friends’ section. Each section will have the same 5 question topics (the ‘you’ section using ‘How did you~?’ and the other using ‘How did he/she~?’
Example questions:
How did you come to school?
How did you spend last weekend?
How did you eat your breakfast?
How did you wake up?
How did you spend last night?

“Whose is it?” Pictionary

  • Go over the use of “whose” and how its questions are answered to make sure all students understand the target language point.
  • Hand out a blank sheet of paper to every student.
  • Have students draw a picture of anything they would like, but try to encourage something original and creative. Make sure students draw the picture big so that it can be clearly seen in the second part of the activity.
  • When drawing time is up, make sure all students have their names written on the back of their paper.

Pass the Message (Advanced Telephone)

Students are placed in groups with even numbers if possible. The students make a line. The student at the beginning of each line is given a card with a sentence on it. The first student tries to memorize the sentence for approximately one minute. The card is then taken away from the student. When the teacher says start, the student must pass the message to his/her classmate by whispering. The message is passed along the line until it reaches the last person at the back.

Sentence Auction

Make a handout with 20 sentences on it. 13 sentences should be correct. 7 sentences should be incorrect in some way.

Students will work in their groups to review the 20 sentences in the handout. They are to decide A) which sentences are correct and which are incorrect, and B) the changes needed for the incorrect sentences.

Each group will receive a set amount of money to buy sentences.

Students must bid on sentences as they’re called out randomly one at a time. They are then told if the sentence is good or bad.

Letters and Numbers

  • Students are divided into six groups and are each given a set of 26 cards. On one side of the card is a number, and the other side is a letter of the alphabet. A=1, B=2, C=3 etc.
  • Ask students to push their desks together and spread the cards on their tables with the numbers facing up. The teacher then reads numbers, and as the numbers are read the students should flip over those cards to reveal the letters. The students must work together to make a word using all the cards which have been read out.

Let's Talk

ASSUMPTIONS

  • The class has covered the relevant language included in the dialogue
  • The students have two sessions to complete this activity.

LESSON SEQUENCE

  1. Preparation − Rewrite the dialogue in the “We’re Talking” lesson that you are teaching, leaving out parts of the text that you want to target. Add or remove parts of the text to make it more interesting/authentic.

Halloween (JHS 1)

HALLOWEEN WORDSEARCH

  • Read and repeat the vocabulary from the vocabulary list attached.
  • Explain what to do and that there is a hidden message to be found.
  • Once completed explain the hidden message

TRICK OR TREAT

  • Do a demonstration with the OTE, they choose a piece of paper from the pumpkin which says either trick or treat. With a treat they get a sticker and with a trick they must do something such as 10 star jumps. (Decide a handful of tricks before the class.)

Paper Facebook Profiles

  1. ALT/JTE explain what a social networking site is, and show ALT’s own SNS profile as an example.
  2. ALT/JTE review the vocabulary on the worksheet.
  3. Students write their own profiles and ALT/JTE help students when necessary.
  4. Students exchange profiles and write comments on their friends’ profiles (like the facebook wall or myspace comment).

Fortune Teller

ACTIVITY:
  • On each side of the CHAT square, the students write down four numbers, four names of the opposite gender (famous people, anime characters, or friends), and four careers.
  • Once the board is complete, have the students write the first kanji or character of their first name and have them count the strokes.  This is their magic number.
  • Starting at the C and moving in a clock-wise direction, each student counts their magic number.  Whatever choice they land on is then crossed off.  They continue this process (beginning with the next choice), until each

"What time is it now?" Binary Watches Edition

An info-gap activity with an evil, mathematical component.  Show students how to read time on a couple different kinds of binary watches. Then, give the worksheets from this file to alternating rows. Have them fill in dots and then ask the student next to them to read the time.

1. Warm up and practice saying tricky times < 10 min

2. Show pictures of the binary watches and explain how to read them < 10 min

3. Info gap activity < 10min

Making English Classroom Signs

This is a fun activity that any grade could do (including elementary school 6th or precocious younger grades). I did it as an “introduction to the dictionary” for my JHS 1st graders.

First, I gave them a blanked-out map of the school, and the worksheet. My OTE gave me the map of the school when I originally arrived so I’m not entirely sure where it came from, but someone at your school should have one.